RODENT PROGRAM

 

What We Do Best? 
Eliminate Rodents from your home!

 Mice may look like cute, adorable creatures, but the reality is they can be full of disease, do damage to your home and generally do not make good roommates. Here’s what you need to know about them and how to get rid of them.

They can make you very sick

While the common house mouse is not as dangerous to your health as a deer mouse, they can still spread disease, such as hantavirus, salmonellosis and listeria through their urine, droppings, saliva and nesting materials. These diseases can be deadly, and if you have a major infestation in your home the risk factor of catching one increases.

They multiply fast

No home ever has just one mouse and don’t be fooled into thinking otherwise. Mice can breed year-round with one female able to produce five to 10 litters per year. With an average of six to eight babies per litter, a family of six mice can multiply into 60 over the course of three months.

They can destroy your home

It might sound overly dramatic saying a mouse can burn your house down, but the bottom-line is they can. Mice love chewing on wires and when they are in your walls and attic — with full access to your household electrical wiring — you better believe they are nibbling away. They do this to keep their teeth short as well as to gain access to places the wires may be blocking (such as the hole a wire runs through). Once a wire becomes bare the chance of it sparking a fire increases. According to the Illinois Dept. of Public Health, 25 per cent of all fires attributed to “unknown causes” in the U.S. are most likely started by rodents.

Mice can also chew through soft concrete, wood (structure and furniture), drywall, rubber, plastic pipes, insulation, aluminum, and even gas lines.

They will always find a way inside

Mice can fit through spaces much smaller than they appear (think the size of a dime). Holes and cracks in your foundation and outer walls are prime entry points, as are doorways and areas around windows, chimneys, roof vents and wherever pipes and wires enter your home. They can also jump, climb and swim, making it nearly impossible to prevent them from getting inside.

They will eat anything

As mentioned above, mice will chew and eat through anything. They especially love grains and can make their way through a box of cereal or crackers without much effort. They also eat between 15 and 20 times a day and will make their nest near a food source (think your kitchen or pantry). The health department for the Region of Durham, Ont., says mice contaminate about 10 times more food than they eat. Eating food that a mouse has contaminated is a surefire way of contracting a disease from them.

They can destroy your home

It might sound overly dramatic saying a mouse can burn your house down, but the bottom-line is they can. Mice love chewing on wires and when they are in your walls and attic — with full access to your household electrical wiring — you better believe they are nibbling away. They do this to keep their teeth short as well as to gain access to places the wires may be blocking (such as the hole a wire runs through). Once a wire becomes bare the chance of it sparking a fire increases. According to the Illinois Dept. of Public Health, 25 per cent of all fires attributed to “unknown causes” in the U.S. are most likely started by rodents.

Mice can also chew through soft concrete, wood (structure and furniture), drywall, rubber, plastic pipes, insulation, aluminum, and even gas lines.

They will always find a way inside

Mice can fit through spaces much smaller than they appear (think the size of a dime). Holes and cracks in your foundation and outer walls are prime entry points, as are doorways and areas around windows, chimneys, roof vents and wherever pipes and wires enter your home. They can also jump, climb and swim, making it nearly impossible to prevent them from getting inside.

 

They will eat anything

As mentioned above, mice will chew and eat through anything. They especially love grains and can make their way through a box of cereal or crackers without much effort. They also eat between 15 and 20 times a day and will make their nest near a food source (think your kitchen or pantry). The health department for the Region of Durham, Ont., says mice contaminate about 10 times more food than they eat. Eating food that a mouse has contaminated is a surefire way of contracting a disease from them.